Photos of managers of an ambitious startup

Smart devices to detect cognitive fatigue

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) have reported that 22 million workers are exposed to potentially damaging noise at work each year. EAVE, a UK-based startup, has come up with a solution to ensure workers are kept safe and connected when working in hazardous and loud industrial environments.

The startup launched its “hearable” technology earlier this year—a headset worn by workers which gathers data about onsite noise levels while protecting the wearer from excessive noise. The data is automatically reported on a cloud-based noise monitoring platform, which produces a heat map of noise across the workplace and tracks the connected workers’ exposure to noise.

The system ensures that dangerous doses of noise exposure can be avoided to prevent noise-induced hearing loss, and tinnitus (ringing in the ears). It also creates an audit trail of compliance to protect companies against future occupational hearing loss claims.

Smart cameras to detect gas leaks and hazardous substances

Despite public perception that the oil and gas industry has been lagging with the times, entrepreneurs and tech giants have been eager to bring advanced technology into this industry. Google is attempting to spearhead green energy projects, and Microsoft and ExxonMobil are pioneering AI ventures. However, when it comes to worker safety, it’s startups who are leading the way.

Rebellion Photonics uses real-time gas detection video cameras that are based on proprietary hyperspectral imaging technology to capture both visible spectrum and infrared video. This allows them to monitor, quantify, and display explosive, harmful gas leaks as they occur from as far as two miles away. The systems can instantly detect what gases are leaking and how much is leaking, allowing the user to assess the situation and prevent worker exposure.

Distran, a startup working in a similar field, has even been able to turn the noise made by gas leaks into an image that can be overlaid to a video of the scene. While traditional acoustic sensors are usually used for this purpose, they are limited by background sounds in usual industrial environments. Disran’s phased-array sensors, however, overcome this limitation by spatially filtering sounds, making it possible to locate leaks and discharges, from a safe distance.

By 2020 the industrial safety market is estimated to reach $3.76 billion. The poor safety record of manufacturers and distributors around the world, presents an opportunity for innovative startups to step in an make real changes which could ultimately save thousands of lives each year.

Right caption

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) have reported that 22 million workers are exposed to potentially damaging noise at work each year. EAVE, a UK-based startup, has come up with a solution to ensure workers are kept safe and connected when working in hazardous and loud industrial environments.

The startup launched its “hearable” technology earlier this year—a headset worn by workers which gathers data about onsite noise levels while protecting the wearer from excessive noise. The data is automatically reported on a cloud-based noise monitoring platform, which produces a heat map of noise across the workplace and tracks the connected workers’ exposure to noise.

The system ensures that dangerous doses of noise exposure can be avoided to prevent noise-induced hearing loss, and tinnitus (ringing in the ears). It also creates an audit trail of compliance to protect companies against future occupational hearing loss claims.

Smart cameras to detect gas leaks and hazardous substances

Despite public perception that the oil and gas industry has been lagging with the times, entrepreneurs and tech giants have been eager to bring advanced technology into this industry. Google is attempting to spearhead green energy projects, and Microsoft and ExxonMobil are pioneering AI ventures. However, when it comes to worker safety, it’s startups who are leading the way.

Rebellion Photonics uses real-time gas detection video cameras that are based on proprietary hyperspectral imaging technology to capture both visible spectrum and infrared video. This allows them to monitor, quantify, and display explosive, harmful gas leaks as they occur from as far as two miles away. The systems can instantly detect what gases are leaking and how much is leaking, allowing the user to assess the situation and prevent worker exposure.

Distran, a startup working in a similar field, has even been able to turn the noise made by gas leaks into an image that can be overlaid to a video of the scene. While traditional acoustic sensors are usually used for this purpose, they are limited by background sounds in usual industrial environments. Disran’s phased-array sensors, however, overcome this limitation by spatially filtering sounds, making it possible to locate leaks and discharges, from a safe distance.

By 2020 the industrial safety market is estimated to reach $3.76 billion. The poor safety record of manufacturers and distributors around the world, presents an opportunity for innovative startups to step in an make real changes which could ultimately save thousands of lives each year.